Bonesetter – Part II

Due to the preponderance of the Murray surname in Northern Nova Scotia,  it was necessary for each Murray family to have a byname.  As would be expected, Peter and his descendants became known as the “Bonesetters”.

Peter and Eliza had twelve children:

  1. Alexander   (1817-1890)  married Christy Murray “Ardachu” and lived at The Falls.
  2. Janet  (ca 1818)  died young, possibly in Scotland
  3. Christy  (1821-     ) married Alexander MacKay “Post”
  4. Janet    died young
  5. John (1826-1917)   never married and remained on the home farm.
  6. Donald (1829-1890) married Jane Sutherland “Square” of The Falls.  Died in Waukon, Iowa
  7. Infant daughter
  8. Ellen   (1831-1908)  married John Sutherland “Elasaid” North Earltown
  9. Angus  (1832-        )
  10. Infant son
  11. William  (1835-1862)
  12. Robert (1837-1906)  married Lydia MacKay  “Judge”

Peter died in 1875 at the full age of 97 years.  As a boy and young man he experienced the centuries old rural lifestyle of cattle rearing in the uplands of Sutherland.  He witnessed the upheaval of the clearances, survived an ocean crossing and adapted to farming on the forest and stone clad hills of Earltown.  He helped found a church and cemetery.  He was the first elected spiritual leader in the surrounding area. Most notable was his lifetime of healing of fractures, sprains and various injuries.

Eliza’s life was no less notable.  She was cleared from her home not once but three times.  She ran a farm while Peter was attending to the physically and spiritually injured neighbours.  She brought twelve children into the world and lost four in infancy.  She died in 1898 at the advanced age of 103!!   What a story she could have told.

Of their surviving children,  Alexander took up residence at The Falls on the farm surrounding the Murray Cemetery.   He was known simply as Alex Bonesetter and may have practiced the skill in that district.

Christy married the boy next door,  Alex MacKay “Post”, who lived on a farm on the Nuttby Road.

Donald also moved to The Falls where he married Jane Sutherland, daughter of “Gib Square”.  He left his young family in the care of the Sutherlands around 1870 and went to Chicago with Jane’s brother in search of new opportunities.  He first settled in Minnesota where his young family joined him.  They later moved to Lafayette, Iowa, where they farmed and Donald made shoes.  He later took up a farm in Waukon where he died.  His widow later lived in Rock Grove, Iowa.

John Murray, son of Peter and Eliza, never married.  He took over the Sugar Moon farm after his father died.

Robert Murray acquired the farm immediately behind the Earltown Village Cemetery.  Like his father, he was an accomplished bonesetter.  This article best sums up his life story:

Truro Daily News, August 11, 1906:  Mr. Robert Murray, who died at Earltown, July 28th, is worthy of more than passing notice. He was justly famous over a wide district as a bone setter.  His skill in reducing fractures, dislocations and sprains, was wonderful.  With a light and delicate, yet firm hand, he did wonders in bone setting; with the least possible pain to the patient and many who passed under his hands will regret his death… The best doctors welcomed his assistance in serious cases.

The bonesetting skill also passed through the family of his daughter Ellen.   Ellen married John Sutherland “Elasaid”, (pronounced Allsage), who lived between Matheson Corner and Spiddle Hill.  Whether taught by Ellen or Peter,  her son Hugh Alan Sutherland was a noted bonesetter well into the 20th century.  He was still practicing in the late 1920’s when he set the broken hip of his mother in law, Mary Sutherland  “Ban”.  It was reported as a complete success.  The poor woman had another fracture in the early 30’s which was set by a local physician.  It apparently left her lame.   Whether the lack of success on the second fracture was due to lack of skill or advancing age, one might debate either way.

Peter Murray’s tombstone does not mention his unique vocation however signage at his homestead on the Alex MacDonald Road bears witness to his life calling.

 

 

 

 

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